Grey Muzzle Common Health Issues

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Tips to Help Your Senior Dog Live a Longer, Happier Life

Senior chow chow
By Denise Fleck [Some portions excerpted from her book, The Autumn & Winter of Your Pet: Make Those Senior Years Golden ] As much as we’d like, we can’t turn back the paws of time, so there are some things we just can’t change about our senior dogs: A NCESTRY: We can’t change DNA (well, not yet), so your dog may be susceptible to certain diseases and defects based on his or her canine parents’ genes. For example, if your doggie’s daddy or a sibling suffered from Bloat, your dog is more likely to as well. B REED SPECIFIC HEALTH CONDITIONS Bichon Frises, Border Terriers and Cocker Spaniels...

Annie’s Saga: Heartworm Disease By Denise Fleck, The Pet Safety Crusader™

Vizla dog Annie
Affectionate, gentle, energetic and built for long days in the field. Vizslas are known to be an athletic breed - eager and graceful trotters possessing great stamina and making them ideal jogging or biking companions. Picture Annie : a Heartworm positive two-year-old Vizsla who is currently on restricted activity during treatment.

Osteoarthritis: An Overview and Treatment Options by Dr. Megan Buchanan

Osteoarthritis, or Degenerative Joint Disease, is a common disease in our older pets. While many owners chalk the stiffness and decreased mobility seen in these pets as just “old age”, they can dramatically impact a pet’s quality of life. Dogs with osteoarthritis rarely vocalize their discomfort with cries or a non-weight bearing lameness. The changes are often subtle and can involve symptoms such as stiffness, reluctance to climb stairs, weight shifting when standing still and a decreased desire to go on walks. Osteoarthritis is a combination of changes seen in a joint. In a normal, healthy...

The key to maintaining your dog’s healthy joints: A holistic mindset! by Dr. James St. Clair

In my first two blog post here on the Grey Matters Blog we discussed simple signs for you to look for to potentially identify if your dog has joint pain or not. We then introduced the concept of “The Pain Trial,” which all dog owners should know about and be able to discuss with their veterinarian. I have listed these posts for easy reference, in case you missed them.

The Pain Trial Concept for Dogs: What is it and why is it important? by Dr. James St. Clair

In my last post here on the Grey Matters Blog, I described the “Silent Signs” dogs show us that they are potentially dealing with chronic pain specifically related to their joints or spine. We discussed that it is critical for us, as pet parents, to change our perception of pain when it comes to our dogs and actually LEARN HOW TO LISTEN to them differently than we do now. The truth is that most dogs don’t cry, whine, or whimper when dealing with chronic pain.

Is my dog in pain? What to look for and how to listen by Dr. James St. Clair

As pet parents we’ve all most likely been in situations where our dogs have gotten hurt. Whether you accidentally tripped over your dog or stepped on their paw carelessly, you’ve probably heard your dog let out a quick yelp or cry and run off. Was it pain or fear? Either way how did you feel in that moment? Does the word horrible come to mind!

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