Complementary Wellness Options

Available Alternative Wellness Therapies for Senior Dogs

There are many complementary wellness and pain management options available today for senior dogs than ever before.

Below is a brief description of some of these options, along with resources for additional information for each of them.

 

Animal Communication

August 31, 2011

                   By Terri O'Hara, Animal Communicator

When you work with a reputable animal communicator, the information you are given is coming from the spirit of your dog. The manner in which the conversation happens is through intuition, also known as telepathy. The job of the communicator is to listen from the heart and be open to receiving information from the animal’s perspective. Content comes through in the form of mental pictures, emotions, physical sensations, energy, and words. However, unlike humans, animals do not talk with a lot of words. The communicator will take everything she senses and put it together like a puzzle to offer a voice for your dog. 

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Canine Chiropractic Care

August 31, 2011

By Dr. Andi Harper - Animal Chiropractor

Chiropractic care focuses on diagnosing, treating and preventing nerve stress caused by distortions in the musculoskeletal system, with special emphasis on the spine. This stress is known as a subluxation. Subluxations can cause physical and emotional malfunction. They are associated with loss of energy, pain, weakness, neurologic issues and disease of all types.  This goes for any subluxation in any spine or body structure: human, horse, dog or cat.

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Hydrotherapy and Devices for Senior Dogs

August 29, 2011

                       By Martha Pease, PT, CCRP

Hydrotherapy is an exercise on an underwater treadmill, as well as swimming in a pool. It has many benefits for all dogs, but can have an especially dramatic effect on senior dogs, providing a painless, fun means of exercise and movement. The water provides buoyancy, which diminishes the stress on the joints, allowing the dog to move without pain. The relief it offers can carry over for several days, and many owners even credit hydrotherapy for extending their pet's life. 


 

 

 

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Physical Therapy for Senior Dogs

August 29, 2011

                                   By Martha Pease, PT, CCRP

Physical Therapy - also called "canine rehabilitation" - is one way to help older dogs stay active and mobile. Any human condition helped by physical therapy also applies to dogs. The approach is different, but the principles are very much the same.

For the geriatric dog, physical therapy goals include muscle control, maintaining range of motion and flexibility, and maintaining or improving strength, thereby helping the dog to stay as active as possible. When a dog experiences less pain, he is better able to climb stairs, get up from the floor or jump on the couch. A therapist's overall goal is to improve the animal's ability to maneuver in the house, participate in sporting activities, position to urinate and defecate, go for a walk, and function in other ways. With physical therapy, the dog may live longer and have an improved quality of life in its later years. 

 

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Canine Bodywork Therapies

August 29, 2011

                 By Jennifer Kachnic, CCMT, CRP - Owner of Canine Wellness, LLC

Canine Bodywork Therapies
Touch. Dogs love it. They thrive when they are touched. No wonder when touch is applied in a therapeutic way - commonly called "bodywork" - it can help senior dogs enormously. Bodywork improves circulation, stimulates the immune system, manages pain, removes toxins, promotes physical and mental relaxation, alleviates depression and reduces stress (yes, dogs have stress too - chronic pain wears on them, and changes in their environment, particularly for senior dogs, can cause great stress and anxiety).

 

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Energy Healing for Senior Dogs

August 29, 2011

                  By Jennifer Kachnic, CCMT, CRP - Owner of Canine Wellness, LLC

The term “energy healing”  refers to the kind of therapy in which a person improves the flow of energy in an animal’s body.  The many different techniques used in energy healing today are the result of therapies from different cultures around the world over the past centuries coming together with their combined wisdom.  There is something especially healing about the combination of touch with intention. It not only eases pain, but also clears imbalances in the physical body.  Energy healing is available for dogs through Reiki, Qi-gong, Healing Touch, and Tellington Touch in addition to many others; however they basically all have the same effect.

 

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Laser Therapy


                                   By Dr. Brian Pryor, CEO and President of Litecure Corporation

“You are going to LASER my dog?”

Yes, lasers are being used by veterinarians in the treatment of your four-legged companion.  We are accustomed to lasers being used in applications as diverse as telecommunications to manufacturing computer circuit boards. Now, they are even treating pain and inflammation in world class athletes, race horses and yes, household pets.  Lasers have been used for advanced medical applications for over 35 years.  Ever since their invention, lasers have been a cool device in search of an application.  Medicine is one of many areas where lasers have made a considerable impact: vision correction, general surgery, lithotripsy, hair removal, cataract removal, wrinkle reduction, and tattoo removal are just a few of the common uses for lasers today.


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Acupuncture and TCVM


 

                                       Erin Mayo, DVM, CVA - Tradition Chinese Medicine
 

What is it and how can it help a senior dog?

 

Traditional Chinese veterinary medicine (TCVM) is an ancient practice that has been gaining in popularity in the United States. Our geriatric pets can greatly benefit from these techniques. Even healthy dogs can see improvements in energy, attitude, physical performance and overall quality of life. TCVM does not address the animal as individual parts as Western medicine does. Instead, a TCVM practitioner will look at the pet from a holistic viewpoint and treat accordingly. In this respect, a TCVM practitioner can treat seemingly disparate conditions, such as a skin condition and vomiting, at the same time and sometimes with only one herbal formula. From the TCVM perspective, the body is seen as a whole and symptoms of disease signal an imbalance within the dog, not just the one body system.    

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